Hemophilia


Description:
Hemophilia is a blood clotting disease. It’s were when you can get a cut, and it won’t clot as easy. But with out treatment if you have a severe case, that person could bleed to death. Even with treatment, internal bleeding in the joints is the most problematic. That can lead to painful arthritis.
Inheritance:Hemophilia is a X-linked disease. But only males get the disease hemophilia, and female only become carriers. This is, because females have two X chromosomes, so the mutated chromosome has on to fall back. Males have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome, so the mutated X chromosome has no copy to fall back on.
Symptoms:
There are many different symptoms of hemophilia. One is bleeding from a minor cut, bleeding into muscle or joints, many large or deep bruises, and painful lasting headaches.
Daily Life:

Diagnosis:Before diagnosis the doctor must preform several blood tests to rule out other disorders like Von willebrand and Dysfibrinogenmia. Then the final is a factor activity test. The test confirms the person has hemophilia and also determines the types (AorB) and how much severity it is.
Treatment:
They inject themselves with purified clotting factors to prevent bleeding. Developing antibodies (proteins) that act against thee clotting factor. Also develop viral infection from human clotting factors. You could damage joints, muscles, or other parts of the body resulting from delay of treatment.
Research:
There is a lot of research on hemophilia. NHLBI research focuses on ensuring the safety and adeguacy of the blood supply. Both NHLBI and the NIH clinical center support research on the basic mechanisms of bleeding and clotting.
Additional Facts:
Did you know that hemophilia was originally named Christmas disease? It was called that because the first person diagnosed with the disorder back in 1952. There are also two types of hemophilia, ones type “A” and type “B”. Type “A” is most common because one in 4000, to one in 5000 males. Type “B” is less common because one in 20000 males.
Punnett Square:punnett_square.png



pedigree Chart:pedigree.PNG


Pictures
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Resources:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/blood/other/hemophilia/hemophil.htmhttp://www.ygyh.org/http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/index.html